CURRICULUM VITAE


PROFILE

  • Name

    Akifumi Kishi

  • Gender

    Male

  • Date of Birth

    September 6, 1982

  • Place of Birth

    Gumma, Japan

  • Nationality

    Japanese


CONTACT INFORMATION

  • Office Address

    Graduate School of Education, The University of Tokyo
    7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan

  • Work Phone

    +1-3-5841-3987

  • Work Fax

    +1-3-5841-3970

  • Work E-mail

    kishi[at]p.u-tokyo.ac.jp


SHORT BIOGRAPHY

Akifumi Kishi received the B.Sc., M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Education from The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan, respectively in 2006, 2008 and 2011. From 2010 to 2014, he was working as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Sleep Disorders Center at the New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA, and in the Pain & Fatigue Study Center at the Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, USA. In 2014, he became an Assistant Professor in the Division of Physical and Health Education, Graduate School of Education, The University of Tokyo. He has a long-term interest in understanding the mechanism and function of sleep in humans. His current research involves the analysis, assessment, modeling, and control of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions in humans. He was a recipient of an Excellent Young Researcher of The University of Tokyo in 2017.

RESEARCH STATEMENT

My research aims to elucidate the mechanism and function of sleep in humans. Considering that sleep contributes significantly to mental and physical health, this research focus is of great biological and clinical importance. Sleep is, by nature, not a static but a dynamic phenomenon, resulting from complex interactions among neuronal populations in the brain. This dynamic feature of sleep can be represented by sequential transitions between various phases of sleep (e.g., sleep stages) across night. My current research involves the analysis, assessment, modeling, and control of the dynamics of sleep stage transitions in humans; this work aims to provide novel insights into not only the basic mechanism of human sleep regulation, but also pathophysiological aspects of sleep regulation. More broadly, I am intersted in human physiology, particularly in the mechanisms of dynamic control, as well as the interaction between physiological systems that allow for homeostasis and homeodynamics in humans.

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